Author Topic: i have a new project, (and another money consumer)  (Read 1561 times)

Offline mizlplix

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i have a new project, (and another money consumer)
« on: January 22, 2014, 05:44:15 AM »
The YouTube video of the policeman who shot a gun from a guys hand during a standoff is really impressive.  It is also cool. 
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Y54aONB3dns" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Y54aONB3dns</a>
It was an elegant solution to an otherwise ugly situation.

The officer used a heavily modified Remington 700 BDL rifle.  But, what is more amazing is that he even had it ranged for such a close distance as 10 yards.....

Truth is, he did not have it pre-ranged for 10 yards.  He DID have a small book with the scope corrections to set the rifle to be accurate at 10 yards.  It required him to have actually tested it at this range and record the settings to go back there when necessary.

In other words he had to anticipate every tactical problem he might ever encounter and test record all of the results-before hand!

It also assumes good equipment and reasonable capability on his part.

I have also wanted a rifle capable of a similar thing.  It is an unexplored subject for me. 

I started reading and researching.......Of course, as it almost always turns out....The best solutions to a weapons problem has already been done by the military.

In this case it was in WW2, when the British had the need for a way to silence a sentry without alerting the whole city.

Their answer: The De Lisle Carbine.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/l3NJojH4r9c" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/l3NJojH4r9c</a>
Made from an Enfielf SMLE British service rifle.

I had a SMLE in good shape. It cost me $50 from a co-worker several years ago.
It was an Aussie version, basically the same though.

It requires a new barrel, a magazine well adapter to fit the 1911 .45 ACP mags and some sort of ejector pin installed into the receiver.

I had an acquaintance that hand made these and gave him my rifle.  A Year later, he mailed it back finished.


There was a couple of differences though:

1-The barrel was a new, custom machined blank and not an old Submachinegun barrel.
2-The suppressor was not integral as in the WW2 versions.  I already had a nice factory made supressor for my M10 in .45 ACP.  It was bought with the MG and papered separately according to US laws.  So, it could be used on many different guns.

I had the new .45 ACP barrel cut to 16.25" to meet the US Federal minimum limit and not incur another fee for a SBR (short barrel rifle).

It calls for the barrel channel in the wood to need a bunch of removing, but my version does not as the can is out beyond the wood.

Today, I am cleaning up the threads after the Parkerizing was done and mounting the can, also mounting and bore sighting the Leopold 24X scope.

I hope to zero this rifle at 150 Yards and have it within an inch at all other close ranges.

Pics later.

Miz
1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.

Offline mizlplix

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Re: i have a new project, (and another money consumer)
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2014, 04:22:10 AM »
The rifle is finally done!
___________________________________________________________

We finally got the project finished.  It has been a long time.  It was started two years ago when we saw the maker's booth at the SAR west show.

He was offering the kit of basic parts or right up to a finished rifle.

We are the DIY types, so we just wanted the parts.  They were on a one year back order.....? WTF?  If you had that popular of a product, simply sell more and "Presto"! No more back orders....(right...)

I guess the guy was operating out of his shirt pocket.  As he got the orders (100% money up front) He would have the parts built. (He had all parts sent out to others to build and he just assembled them.  It did not take us long to figure out that for $50 more, he would do the hard parts too!

Removing a 60 year old barrel, drilling and tapping that rock hard Enfield receiver for the scope mounts and altering the bolt face for the .45ACP cartridge rim. $50 was a bargain for that!  So, we just sent him the rifle.

He would email questions every three months or so.  We finally realized that the fully built custom rifles had priority over the parts kits, so we bowed to the inevitable and had him complete the project.......Grrrrr!!

One year (and a house move) later, we got a package in the mail.  It was beautiful.

He had removed the old barrel, (which required a lathe), mounted and headspaced the new.45ACP barrel, altered the bolt, opened up the barrel channel in the wood stock forearm, cut back the barrel to 16.250" and threaded it for Kevin's Bowers CAC 45 suppressor and refinished the entire gun in Dark grey (Black) parkerizing.

The old magazine well had a block installed and had new channels for a 1911 Colt magazine to be used.  It was just a snap in fit and really was the heart of this popular but rare conversion.

I had a rare Russian made scope.  It has a 56MM objective lens for good brightness during overcast days or early/late shooting in low light conditions.
The scope has a crosshair with a post reticle.  (Not in the picture.)

After mounting the scope, we discovered that the suppressor would not thread on, so I ordered a tap and die set to touch them up.  It turns out that the suppressor end nut was a little rough and had to be ran maybe ten times with the tap to clean up enough to hand screw onto the barrel.  The can has the Bower's ATAS conversion, meaning that it had the newest "K" baffles and the end cap was threaded to accept several thread configurations making it fit many different guns.
In this case, the thread nut would stay on the barrel, the can could thread on using the ATAS threads, saving the barrel threads from any damages.

We shot three rounds in the back yard to test the final product.  Even within the cement block enclosed yard, the sound was the striker snapping down on the primer and the after hiss of the can.  Not quite "Hollywood" quiet, but quite close.



1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.