Author Topic: pics of general machine operations  (Read 2963 times)

Offline mizlplix

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pics of general machine operations
« on: December 10, 2012, 02:23:56 PM »
When customizing an AC motor for EV Duty, it is often required to remachine the shafts to
 mount an encoder, sensor ring or even a driveshaft slip yoke.

This rotor has had extensive work done to both ends. The right end has been turned down
 and splined to accept a Turbo400 slip yoke and Spicer 1310 u-joint.
The left end has been turned down to 1" O.D. for an encoder. The rest of the left shaft was
 turned to .750" for an RPM sensor ring.  The whole rotor was then re-balanced.



Turning down the shaft to the spline O.D.




This is the actual resplining of the modified shaft.

The tool holder is custom made to hold the carbide insert.  multiple .010"
cuts were made to get the proper depth and get a good finish.



The final 1" and 7/8" steps. for encoder and sensor.



 
This was all done in a small, home machine shop.  It is a sample of what you can do
yourself instead of hiring it out.

miz
1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.

Offline wilkes5

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Re: pics of general machine operations
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2013, 04:32:26 PM »
Is doing such a necessary when using an industrial AC (rewound) motor? 

Better question would be, once the motor is rewound, what other fabrication is needed?


Offline mizlplix

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Re: pics of general machine operations
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2013, 04:57:16 PM »
You will need to drive an encoder somehow.
You will need a drive hub also.

The above examples were from my direct drive motor, which is a little more complicated than normal.

you will need an 1-1/8" shaft size to fit most factory hubs.

If you are making your own hub, then you can make the hub to suit your motor shaft.

But, pick a TEFC type motor, so it will have a tail shaft (for a fan) on it so you have a place to put the encoder.

Miz
1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.

Offline HighHopes

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Re: pics of general machine operations
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2015, 08:39:50 PM »
how is rotor re-balancing done?

Offline mizlplix

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Re: pics of general machine operations
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2015, 06:18:33 AM »
Electric motor balancing is done on a dedicated balancer.  It is a waist high angle iron frame with two cradles
to rest the rotor bearings in. Fully adjustable for width apart and clamps to hold each bearing.

A simple flat leather or rubber belt rides on the stator laminations to provide the turning torque.
flat pullys of different sizes are on the bottom near the floor for speed adjustment to accommodate
various motor rotor sizes.

It has two common motion sensors for up/down and left/right that send signals to a small processor.
(Like a tire balancer)  You get not only the weight, but the rotational spot on the rotor to place the weights.

Variable thickness washers are attached to the studs on the rotor ends, which are poured aluminum.
Tape holds them until the finished weights are acheved, then a hammer peens them in place.

The really high-end rotors have been lathe turned on the ends and the studs removed to provide 
 a smooth surface.  Balancing is done by simply drilling holes in the ends to achieve balance.  This is
done to reduce rotational friction.

Miz
1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.