Author Topic: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use  (Read 4184 times)

Offline salty9

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Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« on: February 12, 2013, 12:56:09 PM »
Are small single phase motors worth rewinding for 3 phase use if they have the proper number of slots?

Offline Ivan

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 01:17:34 PM »
Are small single phase motors worth rewinding for 3 phase use if they have the proper number of slots?

Why would you even think of a motor less than 5 hp (motor cycle maybe)
So I would say no on the fractional hp.
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Offline few2many

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2013, 09:15:04 AM »
Maybe to test or practice on? Maybe to run a small device like a power steering pump or something.

Offline HighHopes

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2013, 07:48:27 PM »
i'm planning on using my small 5HP to practise the rewind process and then use it on a boat (normally 20HP ICE).

probably not worth the while to start with a single phase 5hP though.. look for a 3-phase cause i think it might have more slots and better suited.  my 5HP cost me $50 .. not a big investment.

Offline mizlplix

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2013, 11:46:48 PM »
The controller for a small AC motor would cost too much for the motor to do any real good IMHO.

Miz
1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.

Offline arlo1

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2013, 08:35:52 PM »
I have a 1hp single phase ac motor.   My plan is to work out the code for a controller running this then work up to a 100-200hp and higher controller.   Problem with BLDC and AC controllers is developing them is quite costly.  So if you figure out as much as you can at lower power levels you save big money.  I figure I can make a nice small motorcycle with about 10hp from the 1hp motor.

Offline mizlplix

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2013, 09:44:51 PM »
Quote
Problem with BLDC and AC controllers is developing them is quite costly.

I hear that!

There are some of those Siemens controllers on Fleabay for around $1,200

Do you think the cost would be good for the parts?

I am really interested in a higher voltage and current AC controller. 

Something around 1,000Amps and maybe 200-250 volts.

That would really make one of our motors sing. 

Then you would be talking direct drive on a 4,000Lb vehicle.

Miz
1930 Ford Speedster, AC50, full manual powerglide, 6.14gears, 38-130AH CALBs.

Offline arlo1

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Re: Rewinding Fractional HP Single Phase Motor for Three Phase Use
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2013, 07:30:30 AM »
All in steps.  The BIG controller for small car or fast motorcycle I'm working on is with 48 ixfk230n20t mosfets.
They are related to 200v with a lot of current.  I'm hoping to run ~ 800-900 phase (motor) amps.  And the plan is for 170 volts off the charger 148v nominal.  But that's $500 of mosfets and most likely ~600-700 of other parts and just one meltdown will cost minimum of 1/6 of that to repair.  So I need to approach this one carefully.